Silent Films in Which Harry Langdon Appears (A-L)

All Night Long

(released Nov. 9, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Private Langdon wins promotion by rescuing an officer, but he still has to worry about Sgt. Dent. [See "Wild about Harry!" 2(4)]

Boobs in the Wood

(released Feb. 1, 1925: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Harry plays a lumberjack who can't cut it, a dishwasher nicknamed the "Crying Killer," and a saloon bouncer.

The Capture of Cactus Cal.

[See entry for Horace Greeley, Jr.]

The Cat's Meow

(released May 25, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Roy del Ruth, director): Mild-mannered Harry gets roughed up by a slum gang and returns as a cop to see that justice triumphs.

The Chaser

(released Feb. 12, 1928: Harry Langdon Corp.-First National feature; Harry Langdon, director): A judge orders henpecked Harry (who has a roving eye) to switch places (and clothes) with his wife.

Ella Cinders

(released June 6, 1926: First National feature; Alfred E. Green[e?], director): Colleen Moore stars; Langdon has a brief but amusing cameo role.

Feet of Mud

(released Dec. 7, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Harry tries to prove himself by cleaning up on The Street, but instead he cleans house in Chinatown. [See "Wild about Harry!" 3(1)]

Fiddlesticks

(released Nov. 27, 1927: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Harry will do anything to be a musician, but it takes a junk collector to discover his hidden talents.

The First Hundred Years

(released Aug. 17, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; various writers have named Harry Edwards [Rydzewski], F. Richard Jones [Schonert], and Harry Sweet [Sherk] as director): Harry and his wife have trouble with the new cook, but that's the least of their worries when mysterious strangers start popping up all through the house.

Flickering Youth

(released April 27, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Erle C. Kenton, director): "Society slob" Harry, out-maneuvered by a rival for his girl, nearly marries crusty Louise Carver instead!

The Greenhorn

(produced in 1923, release unconfirmed: Principal Pictures short; Alf Goulding, director): According to "Moving Picture World," a Principal Pictures Langdon short originally titled The Sky Scraper ("an aero-plane story") was renamed The Greenhorn. Quite possibly Mr. Langdon's first film ever now lost? [See "Wild about Harry!" 2(1):47]

The Hansom Cabman

(released Oct. 12, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): On the lam from the law, Harry poses as a hansom cab driver (not the motorized-taxicab driver of His New Mamma!) while he tries to extricate himself from a mistaken marriage.

Harry's New Car

(ca. 1923): According to biographer William Schelly, Langdon's vaudeville act, "Johnny's New Car," was filmed, "most likely by Lesser"; Frank Capra credits the film to Sennett. All agree it's the one that Sennett's writers viewed to get ideas for Langdon's comedies. Never released for commercial distribution.

Heart Trouble

(released Aug. 12, 1928: Harry Langdon Corp.-First National feature; Harry Langdon, director.): Harry tries to do his duty and enlist in WWI but is rejected till he breaks up a spy ring. Considered a lost film.

His First Flame

(released May 8, 1927: Mack Sennett-Pathé feature; Harry Edwards, director): His woman-hating uncle wrecks his wedding plans, but Harry ends up carrying off the woman who truly loves him. [Langdon's first feature-length film; produced between Remember When and Lucky Stars, release was delayed. See "Wild about Harry!" 1(1).]

His Marriage Wow

(released March 1, 1925: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Harry loves his bride, but he's bothered by pessimist McGlumm's dark hints.

His New Mamma

(released June 22, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Roy del Ruth, director): Harry's dad's new wife takes a more-than-motherly interest in her stepson (first reel); later, as a taxicab driver, he foils her efforts to snare another man (second reel). [Note: the second reel is sometimes mistakenly attributed to The Hansom Cabman.]

Horace Greeley [or Greely], Jr.

(produced, May-Sept. 1923; released by Sennett, June 9, 1925: Principal Pictures-Pathé short; Alf Goulding, director): Harry captures a hooded outlaw gang in the Old West. [This Principal short may have been titled A Tough Tenderfoot originally; see "Wild about Harry!" 2(1):47. The Capture of Cactus Cal appears to have been a cut-down, home-market version from Pathex; see "Wild about Harry!" 1(2):29.]

The Lady Barber

(1924-25, per Eyquem): Working title for Flickering Youth.

Long Pants

(released April 10, 1927: Harry Langdon Corp.-First National feature; Frank Capra, director): Harry is engaged to a sweet girl, but he's in love with a tough city moll. [See "Wild about Harry!" 2(1).]

The Luck o' the Foolish

(released Sept. 14, 1924: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Newlywed Harry finds himself in the midst of a train-car shootout; later, as a cop, he thwarts a burglary by the same crooks.

Lucky Stars

(released Aug. 16, 1925: Mack Sennett-Pathé short; Harry Edwards, director): Taken in by a quack doctor, Harry hawks the doc's "medicine" and gets run out of town.

The Silents (A-L)

The Talkies (A-H)

Other Films

The Silents (O-Z)

The Talkies (I-Z)

Film Bibliography